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TysonAdams

Tyson Adams Reviews

Book lover and science nerd. See more from me at http://tysonadams.com

Currently reading

Kill or Be Killed, Vol. 3
Ed Brubaker
The Problems of Philosophy
Bertrand Russell
Dead Ever After
Charlaine Harris
Babylon's Ashes
James S.A. Corey
The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work. Alain de Botton
Alain de Botton
Deadpool by Joe Kelly Omnibus
Shannon Denton, James Felder, Ed McGuinness, Joe Kelly, Aaron Lopresti, Bernard Chang, Stan Lee, Pete Woods
Solomon Creed
Simon Toyne

The Water's Edge

The Water's Edge - Karin Fossum Genre fiction is all about escapism, said no crime fiction fan ever.

A young boy's body is found in a remote park. It is clear he has been abused and then dumped. The only lead Inspector Sejer has to go on is the man a young couple passed before discovering the boy. And then a second boy goes missing.

This was an incredibly hard book to read. There's nothing quite like the lurid details of crimes against children to really make you squirm. Karin Fossum doesn't just make you squirm from the crime itself, either, she seems to want you to be disgusted with humans, as she peels back the layers on all of the characters. Goal achieved.

While this was a tough read, it was still a good solid crime novel. Unlike many other crime authors, Fossum seems to be able to poke at the reader. This is both a good and a bad thing, as it makes The Water's Edge hard to recommend to others - especially if you have kids - and to give 5 stars to. One for hardened crime fiction fans I'd say.

A Little History of Philosophy

A Little History of Philosophy - Nigel Warburton If by doubting your existence you prove that your doubting thoughts exist, what happens if you then doubt your doubts?

A Little History of Philosophy is pretty much summed up by its title. It spends a chapter on each famous Western philosopher or movement (e.g. Aristotle gets a chapter; Sartre, Camus, and de Beauvoir share one) and takes a shallow dive into each. Nothing more, nothing less.

After recently reading Bertrand Russell's A History of Western Philosophy I thought I'd read a book that covered the same topic with less of the surrounding history and more of the philosophy overview. Nigel Warburton does this well in a brief, clear, and accessible manner. A strength of the overview is how he ties theories and influences together (e.g. Brentham to Mill, Mill to Russell) so that you can see how thinking has evolved. A negative is the sometimes tenuous segues Warburton uses to end a chapter. Seriously, you really start to notice it and laugh.

This was a great way to dip my toes into philosophy. Between Russell and Warburton I feel I've been given enough to start the journey down the rabbit hole. Made me think.

The Witcher: Volume 2 - Fox Children

The Witcher: Volume 2 - Fox Children - Paul Tobin, Joe Querio I'm unfamiliar with the book and game this comic is based upon, but the story had something of Solomon Kane by Robert E Howard in it. Interested in having a peak at the novel by Andrzej Sapkowski.

The Witcher Volume 1

The Witcher Volume 1 - Paul Tobin I'm unfamiliar with the book and game this comic is based upon, but the story had something of Solomon Kane by Robert E Howard in it. Interested in having a peak at the novel by Andrzej Sapkowski.

Quantum Healing: Exploring the Frontiers of Mind Body Medicine

Quantum Healing: Exploring the Frontiers of Mind Body Medicine - Deepak Chopra Let's face it, Chopra has been a bestselling fantasy author for decades now. He never fails to churn out the most epic of fictional nonsense, but Quantum Healing has to be his most mind-boggling work. I just hope people realise this guy is a fiction author and not to be taken seriously.

Climate Change: The Facts

Climate Change: The Facts - Mark Steyn, Christopher Essex, Anthony J. Watts, Alan Moran, Rupert Darwall, Jo Nova This treads into science fiction territory, but as a work of fantasy, it also holds its own. This collection of short stories is by a who's who of fantasy authors on the theme of an alternate reality where climate change isn't real.

Seeds of Deception: Exposing Industry and Government Lies About the Safety of the Genetically Engineered Foods You're Eating

Seeds of Deception: Exposing Industry and Government Lies About the Safety of the Genetically Engineered Foods You're Eating - Jeffrey M. Smith, Frances Moore Lappé From everyone's favourite flying yogi comes his groundbreaking fantasy novel about conspiracies, genetics, food, and how to ignore several fields of science and scientists by shouting la-la-la-la. Also qualifies as a comedy due to being so laughable.

Gridlock

Gridlock - Sean Black That moment when you recognise an actor/actress but can't admit it.

Adult film star Raven Lane has a stalker. Not the leave flowers kind of stalker, the kind that leaves bodies in the back of your car. The police are only mildly interested in catching someone killing people in the adult industry, so Raven hires Lock and Ty. Ryan Lock reluctantly takes the job, sensing that something is off about it all. There is. In the worst way possible.

It has been a while since I've read anything from Sean Black. His first Lock thriller novel was recommended to me and I loved it. Sean has since branched out into writing a mystery-comedy series that I've got on my TBR (at some point I'm going to have to admit I have a book buying problem). Reading another Ryan Lock novel was like putting on a comfy pair of shoes. Sean keeps the narrative interesting, keeps the pacing fast, and isn't afraid to land plot punches most authors would avoid.

Highly recommend this novel for thriller and crime-thriller fans.

Kill or Be Killed, Vol. 2

Kill or Be Killed, Vol. 2 - Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, Elizabeth Breitweiser After loving Brubaker and Phillips' Velvet series I found myself wondering what they were up to now. So I went to Image Comics and saw Kill or Be Killed and The Fade Out - the later will have to wait for another day.

This is quite possibly my favourite Brubaker series. The writing is tight and gritty, but not without flourish. The art is spot on - even if Kira resembles Velvet Templeton. And it is clear the rest of the series is going to wallow in moral and ethical ambiguity dilemmas. If I'm picking the twist correctly, then this is going to be a killer ending. Bring on Volume 3.

NB: read the instalments for Vol 2 as they came out, hence the early review.

Crito (BCP Greek Texts)

Crito (BCP Greek Texts) - Plato, Chris Emlyn-Jones Less interesting than the Apology.

Apology

Apology - Plato, James J. Helm Socrates would have made a great internet troll.

A History of Western Philosophy

A History of Western Philosophy - Bertrand Russell An important point was left out of this book: The history of philosophy is also a history of drunks.

Bertrand Russell has attempted to give a brief overview of the History of Western Philosophy. In this 900 page tome he touches on the major figures, major fields of thought, and the socio-political backgrounds that influenced (and were influenced by) them. Russell also offers up some critique on these aspects, because it wouldn't be a philosophy book if it wasn't doing so.

This description sounds like anathema to entertaining reading, and it would be if it wasn't being tackled by someone like Russell. Bertrand has a very clear, concise, and accessible writing style, and is easily able to explain in plain language even the most complex of philosophical ideas. Normally reading philosophy reminds me of reading genetics textbooks, as it is overstuffed with pedantry and jargon, Russell makes it feel like he is uses no jargon or technical terms.

It should also be noted that Russell is snarky to the point that you find yourself having to laugh and share his comment with someone. His comments are withering and witty, but they also serve as a great way of highlighting the flaws with certain arguments or "great" thinkers. If there are a few takeaway points from this book it is that the great minds were way ahead of their time, but that those same minds were confined by the structures of their time. It makes you wonder how many of today's ideas are going to look silly and biased to future peoples.

This isn't really a book to read about certain philosophers, nor fields of thought. A History of Western Philosophy is more a cliff notes version of several thousand years of thinking. Definitely an emphasis on the history and context. And it is all viewed through Russell's eyes, his snarky, snarky, eyes.

Wynonna Earp Volume 1: Homecoming

Wynonna Earp Volume 1: Homecoming  - Beau Smith, Chris Evenhuis, Lora Innes To be honest I wasn't expecting much from this book. But I really enjoyed it.

When the TV show first aired I thought it looked interesting. Cool concept, female badass kicking ass Buffy style: I was onboard. Except after a couple of episodes I gave up. The show was limping with material that should have had it leaping. I was honestly surprised it made it to two seasons.

On a whim I picked up this volume (libraries have the best prices for those uncertain reads). And this was good. This was everything I had expected of the TV show. What's wrong with doing direct adaptations these days?

Kill or Be Killed, Vol. 1

Kill or Be Killed, Vol. 1 - Elizabeth Breitweiser, Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips After loving Brubaker and Phillips' Velvet series I found myself wondering what they were up to now. So I went to Image Comics and saw Kill or Be Killed and The Fade Out - the later will have to wait for another day.

This is quite possibly my favourite Brubaker series. The writing is tight and gritty, but not without flourish. The art is spot on - even if Kira resembles Velvet Templeton. And it is clear the rest of the series is going to wallow in moral and ethical ambiguity dilemmas.

Jessica Jones: Avenger

Jessica Jones: Avenger - Brian Michael Bendis, Michael Gaydos, Marvel Comics I'm not sure what the point was of this collection. None of these vignettes stand alone, nor do they fit together. Unless you have all the editions that surround this collection you will be hard pressed to make sense of what is happening.

The Four Legendary Kingdoms: A Jack West Jr Novel 4

The Four Legendary Kingdoms: A Jack West Jr Novel 4 - Matthew Reilly If you have twelve labours to perform do you get an energy drink sponsorship deal?

Jack West Jr was retired. The Fifth Greatest Warrior has saved the world and become a family man. But his old nemesis Iolanthe has recruited him against his will to compete in The Games. This battle to the death takes representatives from the Four Legendary Kingdoms to compete to become the champion. Oh, and that champion allows an ancient machine to stop a rogue galaxy from destroying the Milky Way. The galaxy, not the chocolate bar.

With few exceptions - The Tournament, Seven Deadly Wonders - I've loved Matthew Reilly's novels. They made by taking pure adrenaline, injected with amphetamines, and poured into a stack of paper. The stakes are always high and time is always short. This time Jack West Jr has to save the galaxy by winning a tournament. No doubt Reilly's next novel will involve saving the universe...

I was a little wary of The Four Legendary Kingdoms. While The Great China Zoo was a return to form, The Tournament was somewhat of a letdown for me. There was also the fact that Seven Deadly Wonders, the first Jack West Jr novel, was my least favourite book from Reilly. But any fears I had were well and truly stabbed in the neck. I can't wait for the next instalment in this series.