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TysonAdams

Tyson Adams Reviews

Book lover and science nerd. See more from me at http://tysonadams.com

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Inferno

Inferno - Dan Brown There's nothing quite like an author desperately trying to establish their literary cred by referencing classic works of fiction. Guess what is mentioned in Inferno.

Professor Robert Langdon is back for another inexplicable adventure to save the world. This time a madman with a love for Dante's Divine Comedy and the Black Death is threatening to release a new disease that could wipe out humanity. Only Langdon and his latest arm candy can save the day.

If it isn't obvious, I have a like-hate relationship with Dan Brown novels. Dan writes very entertaining novels that are well paced with interesting plots. But he also manages to bash readers over the head with plot points - or character traits, or other random things he deems important - and squeeze in a lot of useless exposition. The useless exposition often feels like an attempt to impress readers with the amount of research that has gone into the novel, but when he starts mentioning things like Dim Mak - the mythical pressure point and no touch martial arts technique - with credulity, I cringe.

There are other points I find amusing about Inferno in particular. The continuous referral to six foot tall Langdon as "tall" says a lot about the author (or editor's) height. The desperate need to reference great literary works in a mass-market thriller novel. The idolatry of Langdon by various characters - "she was admiring him more and more", "his deep voice" - is heavy handed at best. But for these points I wonder if this is from Dan's success and wide appeal. Could it be that because Dan sells in the billions of copies, that he and his editors have to make sure the book has wider appeal and comprehension? Or is it the reverse; is his appeal that every plot point is hammered home, that the reader is repeatedly bludgeoned with how awesome the protagonist is?

For all the book's faults, Inferno was an entertaining read. Upon picking this book up I was refreshingly entertained. Worth a read for fans of Brown, Steve Berry, James Rollins, etc.

[Spoiler]I wanted to rip the final scene out and rewrite it. Langdon is returning the stolen Dante death mask to the museum but the curator can't meet him. So Langdon sneaks in and replaces it, reopening the exhibit himself.

Boring!

How about Langdon being caught in the act replacing the death mask. Security recognise him as the guy who stole the mask a few days earlier, but haven't gotten the memo about Langdon being off the hook. So they are arresting him at gunpoint, to wit Langdon responds, "Please, I can explain." The handcuffs go on and the book finishes there. [/Spoiler]